Humanist Church Weddings in Scotland?

It Can Be Done

With glorious architectural features such as vaulted ceilings, elaborate carvings and ornate sculptures creating an abundance of atmosphere and romance, it’s easy to see why churches make for great places to say “I do”.  However, what if you’re aligned with over half of the British population who consider themselves non-religious? Is your dream of sauntering down a pew-lined aisle towards your truelove in jeopardy? Gladly, the answer is no!

Last week’s blogpost, which featured Glen Clova Kirk as one of our ‘A-Z of Incredible Scottish Wedding Venues’ got us thinking about non-religious church weddings and after doing a little research, we’ve found five wondrous Scottish churches that welcome Humanist wedding ceremonies.

So if you’re after all the pomp and ceremony of a church wedding without the religious element, take a peek at Team Fuze’s fabulous five:

The Mackintosh Church, Glasgow

Just a ten minute walk from the city centre, the Mackintosh Church or Queens Cross Church is an incredibly popular Humanist wedding venue.  Managed by the Charles Rennie Mackintosh Society, this wonderful building is the one and only church designed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Completed in 1899, the simplicity of the church is inspiring. The darkened oak pulpit, pews and vaulted ceiling are bathed in light through a number of ginormous windows.  A large blue heart in the centre of the western window flickers with changes of hue, as each individually coloured piece of glass catches the light.  The building’s remarkable acoustics, combined with its uniquely atmospheric and uplifting interior makes it the perfect place to say “I do”.

Cottiers Theatre, Glasgow

Built in 1865, this stunning building was originally known as Dowanhill Parish Church, but after years of falling into disrepair, it was thankfully rescued by the Four Acres Charitable Trust who opened it up as Cottiers in 1995.  The most magnificent elements of this beautiful church are the intricate decoration and beautifully appointed stained glass windows, which were prepared by glazier Daniel Cottier, hence the change of name to Cottiers.  With a fabulous location in the centre of Glasgow’s West End and surrounded by impressive gardens, Cottiers is one of the most enchanting wedding venues in the city and a photographer’s dream.


Mansfield Traquair, Edinburgh

Aptly referred to as “Edinburgh’s Sistine Chapel”, the Mansfield Traquair Centre is an awe-inspiring former Catholic Apostolic church located on the edge of the city’s historic New Town. The building was designed by the prominent nineteenth-century architect Sir Robert Rowand Anderson and completed in 1885. The most outstanding feature of the church is the vast scheme of mural decoration painted by Scotland’s leading Arts and Crafts artist Phoebe Anna Traquair. The church was painstakingly restored and has become one of Edinburgh’s most beautiful Humanist wedding venues.

Seton Collegiate Church, East Lothian

Seton Collegiate Church is one of the finest surviving medieval collegiate churches in Scotland and dates as far back as the 15th century.  The completely gorgeous church is now looked after by Historic Scotland and sits amidst beautiful woodland gardens, making it the ideal venue for interior and exterior photography.  The church itself is an impressive yet extremely welcoming building with the most beautiful vaulted chancel and apse and makes for the most perfect venue for a Humanist Ceremony in East Lothian.


Haddo House, Aberdeenshire

Designed by William Adam in 1732 and owned by the National Trust since 1979, this stunning stately home is one of Scotland’s grandest Palladian-style mansions.  Adjoining the north wing of this glorious house is a small but perfectly formed chapel, which was built to serve the family and local community.  The chapel comprises a nave, a chancel with a pink granite altar and an impressive wooden barrel vault.  Haddo House Chapel provides a magical venue for Humanist weddings, with the opportunity to continue celebrations in the House and gardens.

Leave A Comment